Friday, February 28, 2014

On the High of Freedom High

"On the High of Freedom High"

By Austin Steele

Queens College held an open house to high schools with one intended purpose, figure out a cause with which you will attach your name.

In a play that portrayed the racist America of the 1950s and 60s, American college students from up north took it upon themselves to infiltrate the heavily racist Mississippi and get more black people registered to vote. This task, however, proved to be a trying one as many of the students were faced with the possibly of mental, emotional, and physical abuse. In the worst case, possibly death was a likely fate for these youths.

The play of Freedom High had all the drama you would want from a 1960s rendition of the civil rights movement. The emotion, the pain, regret and even love is all bundled up in the all inspiring play that is Freedom High. Twelve actors came to bring about this play where six were professional actors while the other six were college students. This cast was headlined by the two leads played by the characters of Henry and Jessica.

The most important part of the presentation was, by far, the end, where actual people who lived during those trying times had a chance to speak and give their thoughts on the play. The panel of actors and professors, led by Mark Levy, gave personal experiences, memories and advice to the audience of young adults.

The lasting impression left though was to find a meaning and a cause that is worth the fight. No example is better than the story of Freedom High.

"Experimentally Acting the Civil Rights Movement"

By Catherine Nieves

The Civil Rights Movement was a strenuous time in the fast changing America. The social deviance was changing in theory, but in actuality the stubborn attitudes of many Americans resisting to change made it hard to bring justice for all.

Celebrating the summer of 1964 (named “Freedom Summer”) in which many people made steps to make African-Americans equal in society, Freedom High, a staged reading talked about the feelings and emotions that went on by performing this major task.

Freedom High was presented in Goldstein Theater at Queens College, an example of experimental acting: six actors were professionals, while the rest of the cast were Queens College students.

The action centers around the lead of Jessica Kuplecsky, a Russian Jew who abandoned her father’s dreams of following his footsteps (as a scientist) to take part of project based in Ohio. The project, expected to be implemented in racist Mississippi, was to register more black voters. This was a challenge because, as noted in the play, many people who had tried before were either killed, or beaten for being a “nigger lover”. Jessica encounters many other students who want to be part of the movement, thinking it was beyond herself, and her life.

Emotions are very tense amongst the group, worried whether or not it’s worth the risk, whether or not it’s safe enough for the others, and wondering if they’ll make a difference in the long run. It brings the audience to an exciting ending, which is whether or not they survive Mississippi, and whether they made an impact in that society after all.

"College Play Sets Its Sights on the Civil Rights Era"

By Alan Wu

From the first settlers in America to the current ones, they had one idea at mind--freedom and opportunity. In the early years of American history, slavery was encouraged and was central to the success of the Southern plantations. After the bloody Civil War, nearly a century after America's independence, slavery officially became illegal with the 13th Amendment. Even so, the newly naturalized African Americans faced discrimination everywhere they went.

The South was notorious for its racism. Hate groups such as the KKK formed to specifically target African Americans. They were beaten, hanged, and were often forced to live in terrible conditions while police and local elected officials did nothing.

In the play, Freedom High, professional and amateur actors take on the role of civil rights activists who travel to Mississippi during the summer of 1964 in order to help register African American for voting.

Queens College hosted the play due to their historic involvement surrounding the events of Freedom High. The characters in the play were actual students who attended Queens College and felt the need to make things right. The Civil Rights movement was just underway and it wouldn't have been possible if people from around the country didn't see racial discrimination as evil.

The play provided insight for those who were not around during this period. Through the wonderfully written play and talented acting, we can learn to be grateful to those who have done what others were too afraid to do.

Friday, December 20, 2013

RFK Record Vol.7No.2 Is Here!

Click here to read all about it!

RFK Record nets a nomination from the Newsies!

Congrats to Demi Selzer for an important story about staying safe on the road and making the right choices. National/World News * “Legitimate Questions on Media Priorities in Rape Case,” by Genna Mastellone and Catherine Moskos, Townsend Harris High School *Runner-up “School Debates Gun Control Policies,” by John Cruz Jr., Josue Guerrero, and Luis Ordonez-Aguaiza, Edward R. Murrow High School *Honorable mention “Safe Drive and Stay Alive,” by Demi Selzer, Robert F. Kennedy Community High School Judges: Derek Kravitz (Stabile Center for Investigative Journalism, Columbia University) and Peter McDermott (Irish Echo) http://blsciblogs.baruch.cuny.edu/hsjournalism/awards-the-newsies/

Tuesday, October 8, 2013

                Fashion for Fall, Fashion for All
By: Inez Yadgarov

            Check out the latest fashion trends for this season! This year, you want to wear something that will catch everyone’s attention, yet it should be comfortable and warm for those cold autumn days.
Many students in RFK are handling this year’s fashion trends quite well. People are bringing back the “nerdy” look, as well as the classy and preppy look as well. There are some people who stay Rock ‘n’ Roll, and some who stay as stylish as can be.
A few students have opinions on fashion in RFK. “This year’s trend includes shorts and mini-skirts with tights or leggings, cropped tops, thigh high socks, thick high boots, knee high socks and some Rockabilly Bandana Headbands as well,” said Shelsy Corniell, senior, who has a great taste in style. That certainly fits the style for this fall, sounds awesome!
          Army jackets, beanie hats, bow headbands, blouses with flowers or butterflies, over-sized cardigans, denim jackets, fit and flare dresses, floral jeans, harem pants, maxi skirts and dresses, collar necklaces, military boots, oxford shoes, pea coats, quilted jackets, cute scarves, Toms, Uggs, Vans, wedged sneakers, and yarn sweaters are all part of this year’s trend as well.
There are also a few students who have different opinions on fashion. “I think that the best way to be trending in style is to be confident and comfortable in what you wear and what you love,” said Avelyn De Los Reyes, senior, who is known for her style in her comfortable outfits including autumn dresses.
Fashion isn’t only for girls, guys can bring on some trendy looks as well. “In my opinion, I think boots and hoodies are the trend for this fall season,” said Austin Steele, senior, himself often wearing autumn boots with a great jacket or hoodie.
It’s interesting to know the different styles and opinions of people when it comes to fashion. It is also true that you should wear what you will be comfortable and confident with.




 Fall Fashion Dos and Don’ts
                        By: Daisy Moreno
          Starting a new school year isn’t always so exciting. However, looking good makes you feel   confident and will give you a positive attitude for the day.                                                                              Such attitude will contribute to our academic success as we always want to look our best and be the best students we can be. Not sure what to put on your shopping list for the fall season? Help is on the way.
            The biggest fall trend according to Cosmopolitan magazine is Burgundy clothing. Keep this color in mind when shopping for clothes, shoes and accessories. Oversized and knitted sweaters are definitely a do for the fall season.                                                                                                                                               Chambray shirts are also a must wear for the fall fashion. However, they should never be paired with blue jeans or blue pants. A color on another color shouldn’t be worn because nothing will pop out.  They can be paired with black or khaki pants the best.                                                                                                                                                    Crop collared tops are also a good look for this season, only with high-waisted pants of course to keep it classy for school. Flowy and Chiffon blouses are simple but nice shirts that give off an easy going impression. “Floral shirts should be left behind now, let’s not be weather confused,” says Avelyn De Los Reyes.
            Colored jeans are a major trend for fall fashion. Colors like red, purple, and of course burgundy look great. High waisted pants are especially in. Slim skinny jeans are always do and look great on just about every body shape. Cosmopolitan magazine also advises to wear ankle boots and combat boots. They’re comfortable, warm, and cute. Oxfords, toms, loafers and topsiders are also good to wear on the warmer days of the fall. They look good with everything.
            Accessories always bring an outfit together. Seventeen magazine encourages readers to use boyfriend watches. Big and chunky short necklaces can make any simple outfit look better especially bright colored ones.                                                                                                                                                   Scarfs are every girl’s favorite accessory. Infinity scarfs or circle scarfs are definitely a do. Scarfs with patterns can make a simple outfit pop out as well. Light Jackets such as denim ones are always cute to throw on except when your outfit is already with denim pants. Denim on denim is definitely a don’t. Just like a pattern on another pattern is a don’t. On warmer days cardigans are good to use to keep you warm but not too hot.
Fall fashion trending clothing can be found in stores like Zara, American Apparel, Forever 21, Urban Outfitters, and more. The shoes and accessories can be found in Aldo, Clarks, Steve Madden, and others. How you present yourself affects your attitude and other people’s impression of you. Always be sure to add your own touches to your outfits to reflect your personality and not look like everybody else. Dress to impress and enjoy this year’s academic success.


Friday, October 4, 2013

Locker Blocker
By Harry Szeto
            On September 9th, the new locker policy started in the hallways of RFK.
Locker use is strictly prohibited during periods 4 through 8, students who are caught using their lockers after third period will be penalized.                                                                                               
            On the first day of school, one can say that it was rush hour for lockers because students came extra early to school in order to get a locker for their best convenience. Many students, who couldn't get the locker they wanted, were left with any available locker open for student use. A sophomore, Anthony Zheng saw the chaos on the first day. “The hallways were really crowded as people looked for a good place for their locker,” said, Zheng.                                    
            Many students of RFK have been reporting complaints about the new locker policy, but they haven't thought about the problems that lockers create throughout the school day. Students who use lockers during the school day delay students from moving through the crowded hallways and it may cause other students to become late.
“I feel happy about the locker policy because no one is using their lockers and blocking me so I don't need to work around them," said Kevin Jun, senior.
The new locker policy permits locker usage only from Periods 1 through 3.
            As the administrators have said, locker uses during the school day have created crowded traffic jams. Since RFK isn't a big school, it is hard to have over 700 students to be moving in such narrow hallways to class especially since some students abide the restrictions and lockers use a good amount of space in the hallways.
Administrators suggested that students should take out all of the necessities they need such as textbooks or gym uniforms for the school day during Periods 1 through 3. Some people who also share lockers with friends have complained about theft. In the past, there have been many cases of theft in the lockers because students share lockers with their friends.                                                      
            As students may be affected by this new locker policy, teachers are also affected by this policy. Mr. Shin likes this new locker policy.
"The locker policy is great; students are no longer late to my class," said Shin. The locker policies have been heavily reinforced by school staff. Be aware, the teachers are being on the lookout for students who use their lockers and they will subject be to consequences. Mr. Shin warns students who use their lockers after locker schedule will get their locks clipped by the custodial staff. As Mr. Shin said, this new locker policy has prevented some students from being late to class and most students get to class on time.                                           
            Although the new locker policy is a nuisance, lateness has changed significantly. Lockers usage has been reduced and the restrictions in RFK have increased. This new locker policy has created a reinforced school with rules that are necessary for the benefit of RFK.        
                                                      

Friday, September 27, 2013

COUNT YOUR QUARTERS...OR NOT By Alan Wu

It is the afternoon, light shines in from the windows adjacent to the roof. The noise of chatter fills the air as students take their seats on the long, rectangular tables. Friends gather together, large groups often occupying the entire table. Coins can be heard as students rummage through their wallets. It's lunchtime for kids in the city.

            However, some may not be carrying enough money to afford it and others won't even have to pay due to recent changes in lunch pricing, since the Department of Education (DOE) is trying to make school lunch healthier.

            Starting September 30, lunch prices in New York City will be changed for the first time since 2003, when the price of lunch jumped from $0.50 to $1.50. The price will now be changed to $1.75, a quarter more, but students with reduced fee lunch will no longer have to pay for a school meal at all. Breakfast will remain free for everyone that comes to school before morning classes.

             In households of four, if the family's annual income is less than $43,600, their kids will be able to have lunch for free. The change in pricing is expected to help 75% of students and their families, but the remaining 25% will have to pay approximately $45 more compared to last year.

            The DOE expects the extra quarters to bring in a million dollars by the end of the school year. With the economy not yet fully recovered, money is something on everyone's mind. 
           
            “This change would make me not want to eat lunch because the increased pricing hurts my already low allowance,” said Jing Yi Zhen, a junior. “I want there to be a new menu. More students might start eating school lunch and the government can have more money to give away.”
           
            There are many opinions about the new lunch pricing. Some don't care about this change.
           
            “The change won't affect me in any way, but it's good that schools will have more funds to finance more activities for students,” said Tyler Aracena, a junior.

            Others feel the change is a bad idea.
           
            “I believe the change is a negative thing for people who barely pass the full price mark. I agree with helping low income families, but high income families shouldn't have to pay so much because they earned their money,” said Imran Mihrzad, a junior.

            Compared to other districts, New York City is very lucky in terms of lunch prices. This year as well, the Baltimore school district will be increasing the price of lunch from $2.35 for elementary and middle school students, and $2.65 for high school students to a standardized $3.00. Similar to the change in New York City, those in low income families won't have to pay a cent.
           
            The reasons for the increasing lunch price is simple, the bad economy and Obama signing the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, which gave the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) the first opportunity in over 30 years to reform the food served in schools in terms of nutrition and portions. Many have hope for these changes.
           
            “I want them to serve higher quality food. School lunch is okay, but it could be better,” said Feng Mei, a junior.